How you can help Midwestern farmers

Back in the 1980s, when the farm crisis was breaking America’s heartland, my Uncle Charlie got involved. He was an economics professor at Iowa State University, and he focused on Extension and public policy issues. He, along with my Dad and their four other siblings, grew up on a small dairy farm in Upstate New York, and they knew what it meant to be farmers and to be poor.

In 1988, my Uncle Charlie sat down with the good people of Ottumwa, Iowa, and started a strategic planning process to help them recover from the devastation the crisis had wreaked on the community. He stepped up. He used everything in his toolkit to do what he could for the state he had adopted as his own.

My Uncle Charlie died in December 2006, so he’s missing the mess left behind by the Flood of 2008. I’m sorry he’s gone, but I’m glad he’s not seeing the water pull back slowly—the effects of the flood are just beginning. From the towns that were underwater to formerly-submerged farmland, word from there is that now the problem is clean-up and recovery.

As I said earlier this week, the team at Edible Iowa River Valley and other organizations like Local Foods Connection are doing everything they can to help out the farmers affected by this flood. On Wednesday, they worked with Farm Aid to get a donation program off the ground. Farm Aid has done so much, starting with that farm crisis of the 1980s, to help American family farmers get on—and stay on—their feet, so it makes perfect sense that they’re involved again this time.

Farm Aid seeded the pot with $10,000, and they’ve got the venerable Willie Nelson putting his weight behind the effort. He’s playing in Tama, Iowa, on Saturday night, kicking off a several-night stretch where he performs in Iowa and Wisconsin, raising awareness as he goes.

The money will go to help the farmers who aren’t involved in ginormous agribusiness operations—although those folks are no less affected by this natural disaster. The difference? The farmers this fundraiser will help are the small and mid-size farmers who run community-supported agriculture operations and help supply the local farmers’ markets with fresh food and generally make Iowa a better, healthier place to be. But these are the farmers who don’t have flood insurance. Or crop insurance. These are the farmers who have to have their wife or husband work an office or factory job so they can get health insurance.

These are the people working on sliver-thin margins, and those margins just drowned.

If you think you can help, please visit the flood relief donation site and give what you can. I admit I’m feeling pretty helpless from here, but in the spirit of my Uncle Charlie, I’m using what I have in my toolkit. I have some money, and I have a blog. I can use those tools to help rebuild the state that let me make it home for nearly three years.

I ask for your help and your support. If you can’t give money, help raise awareness. Pass the word about this fundraiser to your friends, neighbors, and fellow bloggers. Food bloggers, I’d love it if you’d post something in support of this.

But most of all, if you’re at a farmers’ market this weekend, stop and take a look around. Be grateful for what’s there. Imagine if it was all gone. Then decide what it’s worth to you and help out these farmers. You never know when the good people of the Iowa, Wisconsin, Illinois and Missouri might just need to return the favor.

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7 Responses to “How you can help Midwestern farmers”


  1. 1 Lydia (The Perfect Pantry) June 20, 2008 at 3:51 am

    Genie, thank you for reminding us that there is always something we can do to help. I’m going to make another donation right now.

  2. 2 inadvertentgardener June 20, 2008 at 6:50 am

    Lydia, thank you! I hope you’ll consider telling your readers about it, too.

  3. 3 Sally June 28, 2008 at 3:43 am

    I just wanted to say “Thanks Genie!” We really appreciate what you’re doing.

    (Better late than never – right? I haven’t been online much. Sorry!)

  4. 4 inadvertentgardener June 28, 2008 at 11:07 am

    Sally, hey — it’s the least I can do! And you’re welcome.

  5. 5 prices December 15, 2016 at 1:15 pm

    When I initially commented I seem to have clicked on the -Notify
    me when new comments are added- checkbox and now every time
    a comment is added I recieve four emails with
    the same comment. Perhaps there is a way you can remove me from that service?
    Thanks a lot!


  1. 1 Help the Midwestern Farmers Trackback on June 20, 2008 at 10:01 am
  2. 2 Help the Midwestern Farmers Trackback on May 1, 2009 at 12:55 pm

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